Who’s Your Daddy

I love my daddy.  And yes, I still call him daddy even at the “old” age of 23.  We have always been close and I am blessed to have a dad who is incredibly loving and strong in the Lord.  He has always guided me in spiritual things and challenged me to be better.  He has always held me close to his heart and close in his arms.  When I have gone through hard, emotional times, he was the one I would run to to comfort me and help me stand.  I could go on and on about the things that make my dad so wonderful and why I love him so deeply.  Yesterday proved to be yet another reason why I love him.

I texted my parents Monday evening to let them know we would in fact be closing on our first home this Thursday (that’s tomorrow – YAY!).  My mom’s response was that she couldn’t wait to see it.  I asked when because we had talked about them coming to visit soon.  Her response?  In 6 hours.. 1am.  They had decided to surprise us and come up to help us get settled in!  They leave in a few hours, but I loved watching my dad fix things up around the house.  When our short list was out he walked around and made his own somewhat lengthly list of things he found to fix that we wouldn’t have either thought of or been able to do.  Our tools have also now grown from a small do-it-herself kit to a shelf full of tools with all the basics anyone could need.  Our doors shut like they’re supposed to now.  We have porch furniture and a microwave.  Needless to say, we are incredibly blessed!

I may be bragging a little, but that is not my singular goal here, of course.  Last night my mom and I were talking about how wonderful it is to have my dad in our lives and how sad it is to see parents, particularly fathers, who do not love their children as they should, which may present itself in a number of different ways.  Yet everyone must come to the realization that no matter how much or how little your dad loves you, we all have a Daddy who loves us more than we can fathom.  We don’t need to worry about living up to our dad’s expectations or trying not to let him down.  Sin aside because of Jesus sacrifice and intercession for us, we know that God will never reject us or make us feel less worthy.  We have been adopted as God’s children and everthing that comes along with that.  Galatians 4:4-7 explains it as follows:

But when the fullness of the time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law, so that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons. Because you are sons, God has sent forth the Spirit of His Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” Therefore you are no longer a slave, but a son; and if a son, then an heir through God.

It’s hard to see those dads out there who don’t love as they should – as God loves us.  Dads are supposed to serve as a living example of how God loves us, and it hurts when they don’t.  It also hurts simply to see this happen in the world.  But unfortunately it happens.  Maybe you’re like me and are blessed to have a father who lives and loves as a wonderful example of our heavenly Father.  Or maybe you’re not so blessed and are frustrated or even bitter at your dad.  I plead with you that no matter what your situation maybe to let go of your preconceived notions of who God is based on how your dad is and embrace God as your loving and powerful Father.

Run to Him when you’re hurting; He will mend you.  Run to Him when you’re full of joy; He loves to hear your laughter.  Run to Him when you can’t fix your things off kilter; He will help you piece them back together.  Run to Him when you feel broken and unwanted; He will put you back together and show you just how much He wants you.  Run to Him when you feel unlovely; He will dote on you for who you are.  Run to HIm when you need saving; He will save you!

-Alicia

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About jrwalters

I am the Student Pastor at The Bridge Church in Bradenton, Florida. There are four things that get me up in the morning the Lord, my wife, coffee, and the Green Bay Packers.

Posted on October 26, 2011, in Parenting and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. When I started to give Cathechesis I attended a Course and in it we – cathechists – were taught not to say That God if our Father… because some children have the worst references about their fathers and that could put them off, first from attending the classes and later on the Church and the Religion.

    I was appaled and I still am. But you’re right, not everyone is blessed by a father like yours (his hands-on is another sign of the way he wants to imprint his presence, help and love in your, and your family, life) and not all children are taught that they should feel “just” the Love, for the Love itself, so the ressentements, anger etc grow inside the little non-loved and everyting gets messed in the proccess.

    We, thankfully, have success cases of children who have completely unloving homes but turn to God and Church acivities to spend the Love they came to life with.

    Let’s Praise The Lord for those wonders and pray that He Touches those parents hearts to see Jesus in everyone of those little ones.

    Blessed be, Alicia.

  2. We absolutely love your blog and find almost all of your post’s to be exactly I’m looking for. Do you offer guest writers to write content for you personally? I wouldn’t mind producing a post or elaborating on many of the subjects you write about here. Again, awesome web log!

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